06
Nov 17

Redfish Kayak Fishing Expert – Added to the resume

I have now spent more than five hours fishing out of a kayak for redfish in Louisiana, DIY-style. This, I’m confident, makes me somewhat of an authority on the subject.

In the picture below you can see me fishing Southern Louisiana with James from Alabama. Being the internet star that I am, I was quickly able to take all of James’ knowledge and feed it right back to him. I was so successful at this that James out-fished me, out paddled me and didn’t once leave his rod back at the house after having driven all the way to the end of the frigging island through the various 25 mph speed traps (I may have been guilty of the latter).

Here I am, spreading my expertise.

Here are the overly broad, sweeping generalizations I’m prepared to make on the topic.

  • There is almost no wind. Yup, from my vast, vast experience (see above) there is almost never much wind in the bayous of southern Louisiana. This makes fly fishing much easier than windy places, like, for example, everywhere else.
  • Only magic and dark forces keep you in the kayak. I have been told it is the design of the kayaks that make them stable-ish for an angler standing up, but I am convinced it is a combination of dark, unseen powers and magic. I constantly felt like I was going in the drink, but didn’t and I think the supernatural is the only plausible explanation here.
  • Redfish will eat topwater. Yup. They will.
  • There are bull reds and they look like logs. Like… they look a lot like logs and you should cast at them, not wander over near them only to find out that it WASN’T a log, but the biggest redfish you’ve ever seen.
  • There are a lot of guys from Alabama fishing Louisiana. Specifically, around Grande Isle, once a year, and they know how to cook and have a good time.

I’m sure there are more lessons to impart, but I haven’t slept a whole lot in the past few days and I’m thinking maybe, just maybe, I should.

And… because I know you are thinking it… you are welcome.


03
Nov 17

Bahamas Regulations – Light at the end of the tunnel edition

Maybe?

I mean… is there anything certain?

Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.
Voltaire

The BFFIA was making noise about a possible repeal of the fishing regs, because, ya know, that is possible.

If you want to help with your own shovel full of sand to bury this horrible pile of regulation, there are some things you can do (from the AFFGA).

Please let your voice be heard TODAY by writing the Hon. Renward Wells, Minister of Fisheries, with a copy to Dr. Hon. Hubert A. Minnis, Prime Minster, and Hon. Dionisio D’Aguilar, Minister of

 

Tourism and tell them that:
I FULLY SUPPORT The current flats fishing regulations being suspended immediately UNTIL A LICENSE CAN BE PURCHASED ONLINE AND SENSIBLE REGULATION IS REWRITTEN that actually protects the fishery via conservation measures, protects Bahamian guides, and welcomes visiting anglers to the Bahamas.
 
PLEASE also mention that the attempt for a national fishing organization was a complete and utter failure and BFFIA needs to be wound up as they have made a colossal mess for the Bahamas and they are not recognized as a reasonable nor credible voice in the fly fishing industry.
You may also add your own anecdotal evidence but keep your letters short so they are more likely to be read.
Dr. Minnis’s administration wants to do the right thing but they have joined us in the middle of this journey. Your input will let them know how their constituents and the angling public feel about the matter.
Kindly address your comments to the Minister of Fisheries and cc: the rest of the government authorities below as well as me.
renwardwells@bahamas.gov.bs – Hon. Renward Wells, Minister of Fisheries
primeminister@bahamas.gov.bs – Dr. Hon. Hubert A. Minnis, Prime Minister
ddaguilar@bahamas.com – Hon. Dionisio D’Aguilar, Minister of Tourism
skeeterone.pinder@gmail.com – Cindy Pinder, VP & Sec., AFFGA
I’m going to get my email out today. It will read like this.
Dear Hon. Renward Wells,
I am writing today to lend my support and voice to the many other voices asking you to suspend the current flats fishing regulations until they can be re-written and until a license can be purchased on-line.

I got pulled into the debate about the regulations this last year in part because of the politicization of the process the produced the current regulations. The president of the BFFIA divided the industry and alienated the anglers to the harm of the both the industry and the nation of the Bahamas.

I love the Bahamas. I’ve made several trips to the Bahamas from my home in California. I’ve visited Grand Bahama, Andros, Long Island and Abaco. I’ve made some of my most enduring memories in the Bahamas. The last family trip I took with my mother was to Abaco before she died of cancer. The memories of the Bahamas are good, even when the skies were cloudy and the wind was fierce.

It was for those reasons I opposed the regulations, which I knew would hurt the people of the Bahamas, who sometimes have very little material wealth to set next to their immense natural wealth. I knew this would hurt. I knew the rhetoric coming out of the BFFIA would hurt and the protectionist xenophobia behind many drafts of the regulations would alienate anglers.

I urge you, as you look forward, to not follow the straight party-line process that the PLP and the BFFIA did. Include other voices. Include other view points. Listen to the scientists. Listen to the economists. Listen to as many as you can. Learn from the experiences of your neighbors. In short, do all the things that didn’t happen the first time around.

It also might sound a bit like I’m asking you to do what we in the US aren’t doing too much of in our own politics at the moment, but I don’t think that’s a bad thing. Aim higher. Serve your people, all of them, regardless of party.

I look forward to seeing what you do here and I wish you only wisdom and success. Sorry this is such a long email.

Bjorn
Editor of Bonefish on the Brain, passionate angler.

02
Nov 17

Irma, the Keys, This is Fly and Dr. Adams

Here’s something for you to check out if you want to know what Irma did to the Keys.

A story by Dr. Aaron Adams in This is Fly about what impact Irma has on the Keys, which should give you a pretty good idea of the shape of things.

Now that is purdy

 


01
Nov 17

Bahamas Regs – FFS Edition

And it just never stops.

So… Fly Fishing Chief says the sky is falling and those “special interests” are behind it. Something like that comes from this story about the possibility that the fly fishing regs put in place earlier this year could be tanked.

I mean… am I the only one who thinks the guy has something in common with Trump? He says “Watch out for special interests!” only because, ya know, he’s got his own special interests he’s interested in peddling?

He proclaims the ecology of the flats as under-threat and a sacred thing and then he bulldozes a bunch of mangroves to put in a fuel station.

He decries the poor handling of bonefish by the unwashed DIY anglers, literally saying poor handling was decimating bonefish stocks, and then does crap like this?

Mr Conservation, demonstrating proper handling of a bonefish.

The fly fishing regs were brought about purely through PLP channels, excluding and ridiculing all other voices. The legislation was brought in through back channels, not through a vote in the Parliament, where it never would have succeeded.

Then, this weird thing happened. The PLP got their asses handed to them in the recent elections. The FNM won. With such changes there were bound to be changes in the fishing regs, maybe keeping the one or two good ideas in the regs and getting rid of the protectionist tripe that comprised the rest of it. I mean… did anyone think anything else was going to happen? I’m just wondering what took so long.

Let the Emperor of Bad Ideas complain. He’s like a walking sermon of contradictions and hypocrisy. How anyone is still listening to that guy is beyond me. He can’t be the guy to carry the flag for the Bahamian fly fishing industry and I can’t wait until more Bahamians actually catch on to that.


21
Oct 17

Heading Back to Caulker

Just substitute Cali for Caulker and now you have that in your head.

Just booked flights for get back to Caye Caulker for another Dad/Daughter Spring Break.

Last year was a really great trip and an important one for my daughter and I and I’m hoping this next year is more of the same.

Here’s what I’m looking for in Spring Break 2018.

  • Some quality chillaxing with my 11 year old.
  • Some dock bonefish.
  • A day of fly fishing with the girl.
  • More time in the kayak around Caye Caulker.
  • A trip to the Mayan ruins this time (we didn’t do that last year).
  • Probably another day of snorkeling.
  • No major sunburns.

Hoping to be back at Sea Dreams and I’m going to work through Yellow Dog on this year’s trip.

I wouldn’t even mind that much to see our old friend Mr. Brown.

We named him Mr. Brown

I have high hopes, which is often the worst thing to bring along with you on any trip, but, still, I hope.

One of the highlights from Spring Break 2017.


19
Oct 17

BotB – Redfish Expert

I’m going back to NOLA, because, of course I am. This time it is a conference (anyone else going to Kidney Week???) and I have a day at the end of things to get on the water. Last year I got out there in December and managed a half day with guide Ron Ratliff, who was booked when I asked, about fishing this time around.

My first redfish, photo from Derek Rust, in the Keys. 

Ron taught me everything there is to know about fly fishing for Reds in the 3 hours we had on the water, meaning that now I am not only the world’s leading bonefish expert, but I’m also, like, one of the top experts when it comes to redfish too (if you are taking any this serious, then it means you are why we can’t have nice things).

So, no Ron this time around, I was looking for time on the water. Somehow this has turned into me getting on the water on a SUP in the marshes of southern Louisiana doing some DIY redfishing. I am sure some comedy is going to ensue.

Looking forward to it, although not the falling off the SUP which is about a 50% bet.

 


12
Oct 17

BTT auction has some pretty awesome items

I can’t make it to the BTT Symposium. Wish that was on my calendar, but, alas, life has not put that in front of me (work is firing on all cylinders at the moment).

However, you and I can still browse the auction items for the symposium. It is pretty amazing. Check it out here.

Art. Gear. Get-aways. Guided days on the water.

It is all there and there for a good cause.

Pretty awesome.

Pretty sweet


07
Oct 17

A little round up of stuff floating around out there

First, congrats to Yellow Dog’s Jim Klug who recently landed the 2017 Izaak Walton Award given by the The American Museum of Fly Fishing. I’ve had the pleasure of fishing with Jim. He’s solid. Last year’s award winner was super-talented artist and author James Prosek.

Jim + Cuba + Cameras

Second, hope you like that water taxi ride to Caye Caulker, cuz, you aren’t going to be flying there for a while. They are reconstructing the runway on Caye Caulker, ruling that out as a “by air” option for a while. My daughter and I took the ferry/taxi from Belize City last year. It was pretty easy. One of my bags went missing for a couple hours but they assured me they don’t lose bags and they didn’t. Got everything back with only a minor delay. We’ll be heading back in April and we’ll do it by boat again.

Third, and last, more stirrings from the Bahamas as Bahamian guides and lodge owners are complaining about a substantial drop in business, blaming outfitters/booking agents. Talking to some American lodge owners out there over the past year they tell me business is good, but they are working hard for that business. Lots of dollars put into marketing. I’ve seen the uptick in social media presence that would back that up. There is something like a “it takes money (and time) to make money” thing here. There are also some economic headwinds with Bahamian tourists spending 28% less now than they did in 2000. Add to that a season full of hurricanes that likely scared off some tourists and, ya know… people aren’t just going to come on their own. Licenses are still needed and still not available on-line. A lot of angler resentment still exists due to the push by the BFFIA. Add all that up and, yeah, business would be down.


03
Oct 17

Interview with Jako Lucas – From the Everywhere

Jako Lucas is an angler’s angler. A native of South Africa, Jako has fished and guided around the world. He wrote this interview after closing the season in Mongolia and before heading back to the Seychelles. He’s fished all over for all sorts of different species. He’s on the pro-staff of Yeti (read his interview with them here) and Simms. He is a travel ambassador for Yellow Dog Flyfishing Adventures. He was interviewed in The Drake (seriously, am I the last guy to talk to Jako?). He has a profile at The Venturing Angler and the Amberjack Fishing Journal. Of course, he also has Capt. Jack Productions, shooting some fine, fine video of fishy goodness. And now, he’s hit the big time and is gracing the web pages of Bonefish on the Brain. One of the more interesting reads. I hope you enjoy.

The Seychelles… that’s pretty much a dream destination. What do you think are the right reasons for an angler to head to the Seychelles? What are the wrong reasons?

What a great question. I have always told clients to come and fish the Seychelles with a very open mind, catch what you have in front of you. We have so many different species out there and they are all great targets! So many people come to the Seychelles only wanting to target one species, for example I always say clients get ‘GT fever’ – where they don’t want to catch anything else but GT’s.  It is such a shame, especially when you walk past 8lb plus Bonefish, Bluefin Trevally, Triggerfish… It is always good to have a goal, but GT’s are not around all the time. You can always be ready for a GT, but if they are not there, just catch what you have in front of you, you just might like it. I regard myself as a ‘fish slut’ – I will catch anything that is in front of me and willing to eat my fly.

 

A client opens up his fly box on a flat in the Seychelles. What is the one pattern you wish he had, but never does?

I have always been happy to try flies that clients like to use, as you can always learn something new, but in saying that we do have some flies that are ‘tried and tested’. One of my favorite lines that we get told so many time by clients would be, “But this fly works great at Christmas Island”. Well seeing as you are in the Seychelles, that might not do the trick here… One of my favorite ‘all-round’ flies would have to be the Spawning Shrimp or similar patterns, Puglisi Shrimp or Avalon Shrimp. You can catch pretty much anything with one of these flies. Great guide teams, like the Alphonse crew, are always developing new fly patterns and the one that has been doing the most damage is the Alflexo. I also feel that clients are more and more prepared on these trips which makes the whole experience much more fun.

When you are on the water a lot you see things other folks would just never believe. What is something that fits that description you’ve seen out on the water?

You know, I think sometimes when we tell people some of these stories they might think we are crazy or making stuff up, but I have seen so many unbelievable things out on the flats, jungle or river that I have to sometimes pinch myself to make sure it is real. GT’s always get up to some crazy stuff, so I have seen them swimming full speed into shoals of huge bonefish and hit them so hard that they fly a few feet in the air and then swallow them as they hit the water. They have even smashed a Bluefin Trevally almost out of my hands as I released him. But one of the most amazing things I have ever seen, was a few years back where we found a little Island in the Indian Ocean where the GT’s where feeding on birds. At first it was hard to see  or understand what was happening, as there would just be these big explosions on the water, but then we saw it clear as day. A juvenile Sooty Tern was flying low and a GT completely breached the water and grabbed the Tern by the tail. The Tern managed to just get away, but the GT did not give up and got hold of it the second time. It was still pretty hard to believe, but a little later my client hooked a tern by accident on his back cast and as the bird landed on the water it was swallowed whole by a massive GT. What we figured out later, is that these fish have through the years learnt that when the juvenile Terns learn to fly they either fly low or sometimes fall in the water… and become easy targets and these GT’s will gorge themselves on baby Terns. Nature is incredible.

 

There is another story I have from Mongolia.  It was quite a though day on the water and we had only been connected to a few smaller fish. I moved to a pool on the river that was known for big fish, and luckily I saw a big fish cruising around that area. One of my clients, Paul, made a good cast into some slow water in the pool and the fly swung into the faster moving water. The dry fly got smoked my a good fish and it started moving around the pool and jumping. But the fish just seemed to be acting a bit strange and suddenly I saw a monster tail behind the fish. In a matter of seconds, the 30 inch fish we had on the line got upgraded to a 60+ inch fish! Definitely the biggest Taimen I have ever seen in Mongolia. So what do we do now?! The first thing that came to mind was to ‘stay down-stream’ of the fish and see if we could make sure that the big fish does not regurgitate the smaller fish. The battle went on for 10-15 minute and all we needed was just one last pull. I had the fish right in front of me. Not looking at my client’s rod angle I just heard a massive bang and the rod was in 6 pieces. The fish got below us and there was just too much pressure on the line and the 30inch Taimen was out of its mouth. We were all very disappointed, but what a epic story!

 

What makes a bad day of fishing on the flats?

I personally think that every day on the flats is a blessing. If someone can walk around on some of the most pristine flats in the world and not think they are in seventh heaven I think we are going to have a problem. At the end of the day everyone has to realize that when they are in these wild places it comes with certain risks. Fishing is fishing, and the more you travel and fish, the more you realize that things can always go wrong, but it is just how you handle the situation and what you take away from it. From a guiding point of view, I have always said that it is easy to be a great guide when the fishing goes off, but the best guides are the ones that come back with happy clients even after a tough day on the water.

 

GTs are some crazy, amazing predators. Do you remember your first? What was that like?

Giant Trevally… or as I call them Gangsters of the Flats!

Fishing for GT’s is like fishing for the most bad-ass fish in the ocean. As you may know, when you start guiding you fish very little. In fact, during the early days in the Seychelles, we had no time to fish. I guided in the Seychelles for many years, before I even thought of picking up a rod, let alone cast for a GT. I learned a lot during those years, and when I eventually got my first chance to fish I was ready. I will never forget my first encounter with a GT on the flats. I was walking on a pristine white sand flat, two monster GT’s came ‘cruising’ in line from the lagoon edge looking for Bonefish or any other unfortunate baitfish. My heart started racing, the adrenalin pumping… I managed to land the fly 10 feet in front of them and started stripping as fast as my arms would allow. Both GT’s light up and shoot towards my fly at lightning speed! As the GT’s got ready to devour my fly, the whole head comes out of the water and it looked me straight in my eyes as my fly disappears in its huge bucket shaped mouth. I took a step back and gave the GT a power strip strike to get the hook set and a few extra just to be sure. Line started peeling off my reel; my rod was buckled to the maximum, almost at its breaking point. I was lucky that the GT just stayed on the flats, and I was able to hold him there by keeping the reel on maximum drag. The stars aligned, and I got the beast to hand. Ecstasy, as I held the GT up for a quick photo and the best part of it all, for me, was to slowly let go of the tail, sending him back to his home to keep dominating the Oceans for many more years to come. That feeling of excitement, adrenaline and ecstasy applies to every GT I have caught on a fly rod.

You are from South Africa and the two biggest bonefish on record come from South Africa (although not on the fly). Why do you think that little area of your home country has produced the two biggest bonefish ever recorded?

I am so happy you mentioned this, as every time I tell clients that the world record Bonefish is from South Africa, they laugh at me… Well, I think as South Africans that is something to be pretty proud of… haha. I grew up fishing our coastline with conventional gear and as harsh as it sounds I was taught that some of the best live bait for catching GT’s from the surf is a Bonefish. So I think that we have probably not paid enough attention to them as a target in South Africa but more by catch. Unfortunately we don’t really have any flats where it is possible to target them on fly and it would simply be too hard to target them in the surf.  I also think the reason why they get so big is probably because of the environment they live in and probably genetics. We have very healthy fishery on our coastlines and have really been very focused in the last two decades on, conservation, catch and release and educating the younger ones. So hopefully we see more of those big bonefish get caught in the near future, but I am sure it will be on a conventional rod.  

 

What do you think the next great species to become popular on the fly might be and why?

I have been fortunate to be part of the pioneer work of a few new targets to come out of the Indian Ocean, for example the Bumphead Parrot fish and the Milkfish. These two fish were always seen as uncatchable, but with hard work and determination we got it done. Most of the credit for the Milkfish has to go to the Alphonse Fishing Company crew that really put in the hard yards with the Milkfish. It is amazing that you can hook a 15-50lbs fish on a 9-12wt rod and they have the ability to break anglers. Firstly they are not easy to hook, but once hooked their muscles build up no lactic acid, so they can keep going for a long time, plus they jump… a lot. Another fish that we have put at the top of the list for this year, is in the Seychelles, is the Triggerfish. If you ask any guide what his top 3 fish are in the Seychelles, a Triggerfish will definitely be right up there.

What is the best non-fishing aspect of angling travel?

There is always something exiting about the pre trip anticipation and preparation. Anything is possible, but fishing is fishing and it is never guaranteed that you will catch what you set out to, no matter what you do. I think the more and more I travel around the world, the more I have come to realized that one of the most amazing parts of the trip is the journey, the people and the different cultures. It is so easy to get completely caught up in catching fish, that one can forget to take the time to realize where you are. Enjoy every moment, relax and the rest will follow.

 

Who is the best guide you have ever fished with and what made them so exceptional?

That is a very hard question to answer. I have been extremely fortunate to work and fish with some amazing people in the industry. Without sounding biased, there are some really great guides from South Africa. Their passion for guiding and hard work have really made them sought after all around the world. It would be very hard for me to name them all, but I have definitely had some of my best memories out on location with my fellow countrymen. A good friend, fellow guide and mentor that I have to mention is Keith Rose Innes, he has definitely had a big impact on my guiding career.  I have also been lucky enough to fish with David Mangum last year in Louisiana on a Yeti photo shoot, he was hands down one of the best guides I have ever been on the water with. His passion and obsession for the fish that he targets with his clients is next level. He has a very calm way of guiding you into a fish and you are immediately more relaxed. Loads of guides and even myself can get very animated and loud when we see a fish, but he is just calm. He also has a very affective way of helping you spot the fish, by lifting your rod facing directly in front of you and then directing you left or right. Loads of times the clock system can fail with the client looking in every direction. Also, on a recent trip to Baja Mexico, I was lucky enough to chase some Roosters from the beach with some of the industries best, Oliver White, Blane Chocklett, Christiaan Pretorius. There we also got to spend some time with Lance Peterson and you will find very few people that are more passionate and knowledgeable about the location they guide at.  Someone I have always wanted to meet was Flip Pallot and 2 years ago a good friend John Wilson and owner of Cortland Fly Lines managed to arrange a day on the flats with Flip. It is definitely one of my favorite fishing trip memories!  

Great read Jako. Thank for putting in the time. 


18
Sep 17

The Cruel Season

Maybe there have been years as bad as this. I haven’t been paying attention for very long, in the big scheme of things. This hurricane season seems… just cruel.

Harvey was bad. Irma was horrible. Now comes Maria and you just have to hope the oceans cool down and steal the strength from anything yet to form far out in the Eastern Atlantic.

The Keys got clobbered. Rebuilding is going to take a while. Robbies pretty well rolled over, a place so full of fond memories for thousands of Keys-goers.

Photo from Miami Herald

From not too long ago.

Places to give:

Guides Trust Foundation – guides from the Keys
USVI relief – They got hammered and have fewer resources than most of the rest of the US.
Red Cross – Because they are everywhere, working hard.
Greater Houston Community Foundation – Let’s not forget about Harvey.